Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Question.

Let's say you might have a stress fracture, but don't know, and want to be careful. One of the lateral metatarsals is affected.

Is there a safe way to maintain muscular strength of the area without applying mechanical stress to the bone?


8 comments:

  1. Christine would probably be a good one to talk to. I know she had a different stress fracture but she did all sort of cross training. On the other hand, when I had my stress fracture (or possibly just a stress reaction, never got the MRI to confirm one or the other) in the 3rd metatarsal in my foot, I just took time off from training entirely, as that was the best option for me. I never was the cross training type... Good luck! Hope it's nothing but being safe for a bit is probably the best bet....

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    1. Thanks Danielle! I totally already talked to Christine :) and indeed she offered some great suggestions and intel about her experience. Hers sounds like it happened fast though, and mine -- if it even is one -- seems to be a bit of a different creature. Slow onset, no big snap. So, I figured I'd put it out the "the panel" before I decide if it is worth "getting it looked at", since I know many of you have probably dealt with such things! Curious - how long did you stop training for?

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    2. Xar, I would have to look back at my training log to be sure, but I believe I took about a month off entirely, maybe even more, then came back very very slowly... I wonder, do you think the pressure in your foot could be the product of moving differently because of your back or something... in all my visits with Dr. Jamie, there's nothing I haven't learned more than "it's all connected!"

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    3. Yes, it's related. Lost a ton of muscle tone in my left leg in the throes of the back saga. At the worst of it, proprioception in my left leg/foot was out of whack too. Microspikes have been a lifesaver many times.

      One of my theories is that in attempting to work through the imbalance via that leg, I was trying very slightly to land more on the outside of my foot. (All the weakness made the leg want to cave inward - even the arch in my left foot was lower.) And though I tried to make the adjustment very subtle, the pavement rather brisk increase in back to back miles may have been like the perfect storm.

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  2. !? Gack ?!

    my brother has had two. he might be a good one to talk to. he tried to run through the first - did all kinds of shoe mods to relieve pressure from said frac. I'll tell him to weigh in.

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    1. I agree with gack! And I was having such fun with my relative level of soundness! Biking has been great though, and this kind of thing should heal in weeks if I figure it out right. A minor blip. Would love to hear for John's take if he has a few minutes!

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  3. I have a great orthopedic doctor if you are interested. I have no stress fracture, but turf toe, he helped me greatly. You need to have someone look at this if it's been going on for a long time.
    Yes, time off is key. I have lost track how long I have been off now. Going ape-shit batty.

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    1. Thanks Amy, I hope you are healed up soon. Time off can be maddening for sure. :/

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What do you think?